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PIXEL MELT

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PIXEL MELT requires a webcam and has a separate desktop and a mobile device version. Please use Safari for iOS devices. We recommend using Google Chrome or Firefox for desktop and Android devices.

 Easily create your own beautiful piece of digital artwork using your movement.

ARTECHOUSE’s “PIXEL MELT” is a variation of the classic pixel sorting technique, modified to work with video. The process involves using the brightness values from an input (in this case a camera) to push pixels in a given direction. The direction and strength of this displacement is determined by the position of the mouse in relation to the center of the screen. While no reordering takes place like in traditional pixel sorting, the shifting of pixels creates a quality reminiscent of pixel sorting and fits within the greater glitch-art aesthetic.

Spend the time to discover each tool. Play with them to find something unique to you. Use a creative combination of your body and mouse movement! 

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PIXEL MELT

Traditional pixel sorting works by analyzing and reordering the pixels in the rows or columns of an image. First, each row (or column) of an image is broken into “intervals.” These intervals are defined by groups of pixels that share a quality, such as similar brightness or color. Then, each interval is reordered, sorting by other criteria. The resulting image will contain many lines (the intervals) that gradually transition in brightness or color. Additional techniques can be used to determine how much of the original image remains intact, and which portions are affected by the sorting.

Pixel sorting, in its most basic terms, is a way to alter an image using an algorithm. It is a process in which rows or columns of pixels in an image are reordered, using any number of criteria, like hue or brightness, to sort them. The result can be quite unexpected, from beautiful renditions to haunting redesigns. It is widely thought that Kim Asendorf, a German artist, is responsible for creating the first-pixel sorting program in 2010 and popularizing the practice.

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